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Subject Keyword ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY ♦ ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION ♦ DISTRICT HEATING ♦ TECHNOLOGY UTILIZATION ♦ CO-GENERATION ♦ COMMUNITIES ♦ ECONOMICS ♦ ENERGY CONSERVATION ♦ ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS ♦ FINANCIAL INCENTIVES ♦ HEAT DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS ♦ HEATING SYSTEMS ♦ LOCAL GOVERNMENT ♦ POWER GENERATION ♦ PUBLIC UTILITIES ♦ SWEDEN ♦ TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER ♦ TRANSPORT ♦ DEUS ♦ EUROPE ♦ HEATING ♦ SCANDINAVIA ♦ STEAM GENERATION 290800* -- Energy Planning & Policy-- Heat Utilization-- (1980-) ♦ Energy Conservation, Consumption, & UtilizationMunicipalities & Community SystemsPublic Utilities(1980-)
Abstract The Swedish experience with district heating systems was interpreted to American audiences during a series of six regional workshops, the first held October 10 in Washington, D.C. The Swedes expressed enthusiasm for the system and suggested bilateral trade opportunities. District heating was presented as a way for the U.S. to save energy and derive both economic and environmental benefits. A concept that originated in the U.S. in 1877, district heating now provides less than one percent of the energy demand here while expanding in Europe. Economic incentives include overall efficiency of 80% and the opportunity to use fuels other than oil and natural gas. Distribution costs can be high in low-density areas, but Sweden has adopted a step-by-step approach that stresses standardization and high-density application. The environmental advantages include better control over emissions and reduced fuel traffic. The workshop included an examination of a Twin Cities project in Minnesota.
Educational Use Research
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 1978-11-01
Publisher Place United States
Journal EPRI J.
Volume Number 3
Issue Number 9


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