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Author For, B. -Q ♦ Green, E. M. ♦ Fontaine, G. ♦ Drechsel, H. ♦ Shaw, J. S. ♦ Dittmann, J. A. ♦ Fay, A. G. ♦ Francoeur, M. ♦ Laird, J. ♦ Moriyama, E. ♦ Morris, M. ♦ Rodríguez-López, C. ♦ Sierchio, J. M. ♦ Story, S. M. ♦ Strom, A. ♦ Wang, C. ♦ Adams, S. M. ♦ Bolin, D. E. ♦ Eskew, M. ♦ Chayer, P.
Source arXiv.org
Content type Text
File Format PDF
Date of Submission 2009-11-10
Language English
Subject Domain (in DDC) Computer science, information & general works ♦ Natural sciences & mathematics ♦ Astronomy & allied sciences ♦ Physics
Subject Keyword Astrophysics - Solar and Stellar Astrophysics ♦ physics:astro-ph
Abstract We present new photometric and spectroscopic observations for 2M 1533+3759 (= NSVS 07826147). It has an orbital period of 0.16177042 day, significantly longer than the 2.3--3.0 hour periods of the other known eclipsing sdB+dM systems. Spectroscopic analysis of the hot primary yields Teff = 29230 +/- 125 K, log g = 5.58 +/- 0.03 and log N(He)/N(H) = -2.37 +/- 0.05. The sdB velocity amplitude is K1 = 71.1 +/- 1.0 km/s. The only detectable light contribution from the secondary is due to the surprisingly strong reflection effect. Light curve modeling produced several solutions corresponding to different values of the system mass ratio, q(M2/M1), but only one is consistent with a core helium burning star, q=0.301. The orbital inclination is 86.6 degree. The sdB primary mass is M1 = 0.376 +/- 0.055 Msun and its radius is R1 = 0.166 +/- 0.007 Rsun. 2M1533+3759 joins PG0911+456 (and possibly also HS2333+3927) in having an unusually low mass for an sdB star. SdB stars with masses significantly lower than the canonical value of 0.48 Msun, down to as low as 0.30 Msun, were theoretically predicted by Han et al. (2002, 2003), but observational evidence has only recently begun to confirm the existence of such stars. The existence of core helium burning stars with masses lower than 0.40--0.43 Msun implies that at least some sdB progenitors have initial main sequence masses of 1.8--2.0 Msun or more, i.e. they are at least main sequence A stars. The secondary is a main sequence M5 star.
Description Reference: Astrophys.J.708:253-267,2010
Educational Use Research
Learning Resource Type Article
Page Count 47


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