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Author Metzger, B. D. ♦ Piro, A. L. ♦ Quataert, E.
Source arXiv.org
Content type Text
File Format PDF
Date of Submission 2008-05-28
Language English
Subject Domain (in DDC) Computer science, information & general works ♦ Natural sciences & mathematics ♦ Astronomy & allied sciences ♦ Physics
Subject Keyword Astrophysics ♦ physics:astro-ph
Abstract We present time-dependent models of the accretion disks created during compact object mergers, focusing on the energy available from accretion at late times and the composition of the disk and its outflows. We calculate the dynamics near the outer edge of the disk, which contains the majority of the mass and sets the accretion rate onto the central black hole. This allows us to follow the evolution over much longer timescales than current hydrodynamic simulations. At late times the disk becomes advective and its properties asymptote to self-similar solutions with accretion rate dM/dt ~ t^(-4/3) (neglecting outflows). This late-time accretion can in principle provide sufficient energy to power the late-time activity observed from some short-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). However, because outflows during the advective phase unbind the majority of the remaining mass, it is difficult for the remnant disk alone to produce significant accretion power well beyond the onset of the advective phase. Unless the viscosity is quite low (alpha ~1e-3), this occurs before the start of observed flaring at ~ 30 s; continued mass inflow thus appears required to explain the late-time activity from short GRBs. We show that the composition of the disk freezes-out relatively neutron-rich (electron fraction Ye ~ 0.3). Roughly 1e-2 Msun of this neutron-rich material is ejected by winds at late times. During earlier, neutrino-cooled phases of accretion, neutrino irradiation of the disk produces a wind with Ye ~ 0.5, which synthesizes at most ~ 1e-3 Msun of Ni56. We highlight what conditions are favorable for Ni56 production and predict, in the best cases, optical and infrared transients peaking ~ 0.5-2 days after the burst, with fluxes a factor of ~ 10 below the current observational limits.
Description Comment: 19 pages, 15 figures; minor changes to figures and text; temperature figure added; Accepted to MNRAS
Educational Use Research
Learning Resource Type Article
Page Count 19


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