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Author Minh, Y. C. ♦ Su, Y. -N. ♦ Liu, S. -Y. ♦ Yan, C. -H. ♦ Chen, H. -R. ♦ Kim, S. -J.
Source United States Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information
Content type Text
Language English
Subject Keyword ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY ♦ ABUNDANCE ♦ DUSTS ♦ EVAPORATION ♦ METHANOL ♦ SILICON OXIDES ♦ STAR EVOLUTION ♦ STARS ♦ ALCOHOLS ♦ CHALCOGENIDES ♦ EVOLUTION ♦ HYDROXY COMPOUNDS ♦ ORGANIC COMPOUNDS ♦ OXIDES ♦ OXYGEN COMPOUNDS ♦ PHASE TRANSFORMATIONS ♦ SILICON COMPOUNDS
Abstract The massive star-forming core MM1 of W75N was observed using the Submillimeter Array with {approx}1'' and 2'' spatial resolutions at 217 and 347 GHz, respectively. From the 217 GHz continuum we found that the MM1 core consists of two sources, separated by about 1'': MM1a ({approx}0.6 M{sub sun}) and MM1b ({approx}1.4 M{sub sun}), located near the radio continuum sources VLA 2/VLA 3 and VLA 1, respectively. Within MM1b, two gas clumps were found to be expanding away from VLA 1 at about {+-}3 km s{sup -1}, as a result of the most recent star formation activity in the region. Observed molecular lines show emission peaks at two positions, MM1a and MM1b: sulfur-bearing species have emission peaks toward MM1a, but methanol and saturated species at MM1b. We identified high-temperature ({approx}200 K) gas toward MM1a and the hot core in MM1b. This segregation may result from the evolution of the massive star-forming core. In the very early phase of star formation, the hot core is seen through the evaporation of dust ice-mantle species. As the mantle species are consumed via evaporation the high-temperature gas species (such as the sulfur-bearing molecules) become bright. The SiO molecule is unique in having an emission peak exactly at the VLA 2 position, probably tracing a shock powered by VLA 2. The observed sulfur-bearing species show similar abundances both in MM1a and MM1b, whereas the methanol and saturated species show significant abundance enhancement toward MM1b, by about an order of magnitude, compared to MM1a.
ISSN 0004637X
Educational Use Research
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 2010-11-10
Publisher Place United States
Journal Astrophysical Journal
Volume Number 723
Issue Number 2


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