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Author Rosenberg, T. J. ♦ Detrick, D. L. ♦ Mizera, P. F. ♦ Gorney, D. J. ♦ Berkey, F. T. ♦ Eather, R. H. ♦ Lanzerotti, L. J.
Source United States Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information
Content type Text
Language English
Subject Keyword CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS ♦ AURORAE ♦ ELECTRON PRECIPITATION ♦ ABSORPTION ♦ CURRENT DENSITY ♦ EARTH MAGNETOSPHERE ♦ ELECTROJETS ♦ EXPERIMENTAL DATA ♦ IONOSPHERE ♦ POLAR REGIONS ♦ RADIO NOISE ♦ SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE ♦ CHARGED-PARTICLE PRECIPITATION ♦ CURRENTS ♦ DATA ♦ EARTH ATMOSPHERE ♦ EARTH PLANET ♦ ELECTRIC CURRENTS ♦ ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION ♦ INFORMATION ♦ NOISE ♦ NUMERICAL DATA ♦ PLANETARY IONOSPHERES ♦ PLANETS ♦ RADIATIONS ♦ RADIOWAVE RADIATION ♦ Atmospheric Physics- Auroral, Ionospheric, & Magetospheric Phenomena
Abstract Coincident ground-based and satellite observations are presented of a premidnight auroral surge over Amundsen-Scott South Pole station. The set of near-simultaneous measurements provides an excellent opportunity to gain a more quantitative understanding of the nature of premidnight substorm activity at high geomagnetic latitudes. The surge produced a rapid onset of cosmic radio noise absorption at the station. On the polar-orbiting DMSP F6 spacecraft, intense X ray emissions with E>2 keV energy were imaged 1/sup 0/ to 2/sup 0/ magnetically equatorward of South Pole approximately 1 min prior to the peak of the absorption event. The spectrum of precipitating electrons determined from the X ray measurements could be characterized by an e-folding energy of approx.11 keV and is found to be adequate to account for the cosmic noise absorption and maximum auroral luminosity recorded at South Pole. Photometer, all-sky camera, riometer, and magnetometer data are used to estimate the velocity of motion and spatial extent of the auroral precipitation and the ionospheric currents associated with the surge. The electron precipitation region is deduced to have a latitudinal scale size of <100 km and to move poleward with a speed of approx.1--2 km/s coincident with the movement of a westward electrojet.
Educational Use Research
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 1987-10-01
Publisher Department Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park
Publisher Place United States
Journal J. Geophys. Res.
Volume Number 92
Issue Number A10
Organization Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park


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