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Researcher Mandpe, S. S.
Advisor Shukla, Abhishek
Source KrishiKosh-Indian National Agricultural Research System
Content type Text
Educational Degree Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)
Publisher AGRICULTURAL ENTOMOLOGY DEPT., N.M. COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE
File Format PDF
Language English
Subject Domain (in DDC) Technology ♦ Agriculture & related technologies ♦ Plant injuries, diseases & pests
Subject Keyword Agricultural Entomology ♦ Ph.d. Thesis
Abstract A study was conducted in the year 2014–15 and 2015-16 to explore the fauna of phytoseiid mites from different agri-horticultural crops, ornamentals, weeds, wild vegetation and leaf litter at the campus of Navsari Agricultural University, Navsari. Overall, 357 phytoseiid mite specimens were collected from different vegetations. Out of these specimens, 37 species belonging to 3 subfamilies of family phytoseiidae were identified. Total 32 species of the subfamily Amblyseiinae (87%) were recorded on different crop plants and weeds. These 32 species were belonging to 8 different genera viz., Amblyseius (6 species), Euseius (8 species), Neoseiulus (8 species), Paraphytoseius (1 species), Typhlodromalus (5 species), Typhlodromi (1 species), Typhlodromips (1 species) and Indoseiulus (2 species). One genus belonging to sub family Phytoseiinae (5%) and Typhlodrominae (8%) viz., Phytoseius (2 species) and Typhlodromus (3 species), respectively were also recorded during the survey. Among different crop ecosystems, fruit crops supported maximum numbers of species (22 species) as compared to field crops (11 species), vegetable crops (9 species), ornamental crops (9 species), narrow and broad leaf weeds (8 species) while, no species were recorded on wild vegetations and in leaf litter. Morphometric study revealed that maximum length of gnathosoma was observed in Amblyseius (Neoseiulus) paspalvorus (De Leon) (213.28±1.22 Abstract μm) while, Amblyseius (Euseius) eucalypti Ghai and Memon had shortest gnathosoma (84.25±1.17 μm). Indoseiulus eharai Gupta possessed maximum length of idiosoma (423.70±1.49 μm) while, Amblyseius (Euseius) eucalypti has shortest idiosoma (239.00±1.05 μm). Amblyseius (Neoseiulus) aceriae Gupta recorded maximum width of idiosoma (270.00±1.16 μm) while, shortest width of idiosoma possessed by Indoseiulus ricini (Ghai and Memon) (124.00±0.94 μm). Total body length was recorded maximum in Indoseiulus eharai measuring 622.90±1.70 μm whereas, shortest body length was recorded in Amblyseius (Euseius) eucalypti (322.48±0.91 μm). Biological studies revealed that the total developmental period of the female and male A. alstoniae was 19.17±1.14 and 15.71±1.12 days; 19.83±1.04 and 16.39±1.12 days; 17.80±1.26 and 13.98±1.35 days when reared on O. indicus, P. latus and T. urticae, respectively. The total life period from egg to the death of the adult was 42.23±1.38, 42.76±1.30 and 42.47±1.34 days for mated female, 27.65±1.14, 27.77±1.35 and 27.27±1.22 days for unmated female and it was durated 21.31±1.20, 21.69±1.42 and 19.41±1.31 days for male, fed upon O. indicus, P. latus and T. urticae, respectively. Individual mated female laid total 19.57±1.53, 20.00±1.68 and 34.87±1.12 eggs while, unmated female laid 6.97±1.37, 6.17±0.92 and 9.80±1.03 eggs when fed upon O. indicus, P. latus and T. urticae, respectively. The total developmental period of the female and male A. finlandicus was 17.76±1.04 and 14.84±0.94 days; 18.97±0.95 and 16.15±0.87 days; 15.03±0.82 and 12.01±0.92 days when reared on O. indicus, P. latus and T. urticae, respectively however, the total life period from egg to the death of the adult mite was 44.00±1.15, 48.47±1.09 and 38.64±1.19 days for mated female, 29.96±1.02, 32.34±1.39 and 25.90±1.43 days for unmated female and was 21.57±1.36, 23.32±1.17 and 18.28±1.33 days for male while praying on O. indicus, P. latus and T. urticae, respectively. Individual mated female laid total 27.20±2.94, 38.00±2.54 and 58.00±5.64 eggs while, unmated female laid 15.37±1.11, 17.67±1.13 and 27.20±2.40 eggs when fed upon O. indicus, P. latus and T. urticae, respectively. Abstract The total developmental period of the female and male of A. longispinosus was 15.97±0.51 and 13.19±0.62 days; 15.97±0.58 and 13.25±0.44 days; 13.77±0.59 and 10.64±0.48 days when, reared on O. indicus, P. latus and T. urticae, respectively while, the total life period from egg to the death of the adult mite was 40.43±1.15, 41.56±1.21 and 34.97±1.12 days for mated female, 25.93±1.08, 26.97±1.25 and 22.27±1.09 days for unmated female and it was 21.46±1.12, 22.28±1.28 and 18.11±1.03 days for male, when fed upon O. indicus, P. latus and T. urticae, respectively. On an average the individual mated female laid 33.80±0.98, 28.97±1.79 and 45.47±2.65 eggs while, unmated female laid 9.20±1.02, 10.70±1.07 and 13.84±1.30 eggs while praying upon O. indicus, P. latus and T. urticae, respectively. Among various alternate food sources the adult male and female longevity of A. alstoniae, A. finlandicus and A. longispinosus was maximum (7.00 and 14.30 days, 7.80 and 12.60 days, 10.10 and 14.50 days, respectively) when fed with mixture of castor pollen + yeast + honey, while in case of primary food sources maximum adult male and female longevity i.e. 27.30 and 16.30 days, 26.20 and 12.40 days, 27.10 and 17.10 days, respectively for A. alstoniae, A. finlandicus and A. longispinosus when fed upon mixed stages of T. urticae. Fecundity of predatory mites viz., A. alstoniae, A. finlandicus and A. longispinosus was highest i.e. 5.70, 9.60 and 10.50 eggs, respectively when fed with mixture of castor pollens + yeast + honey. Among primary food sources the fecundity of A. alstoniae, A. finlandicus and A. longispinosus was maximum i.e. 36.90, 27.10 and 53.90, respectively when reared on mixed stages of T. urticae. During entire life period male A. alstoniae consumed 22.97±2.56, 13.27±1.09 and 8.44±1.38 eggs, mixed stages and adults of O. indicus, 36.80±2.05, 13.90±0.96 and 8.30±0.96 eggs, mixed stages and adults of P. latus and 21.27±1.87, 13.53±1.13 and 7.93±1.22 eggs, mixed stages and adults of T. urticae, respectively. While, the female consumed 29.34±3.05, 19.27±1.62 and 12.93±1.42 eggs, mixed stages and adults of O. indicus, 43.63±2.52, 17.84±1.47 and 10.57±0.88 eggs, mixed stages and adults of P. latus and 27.47±1.82, Abstract 17.57±1.25 and 12.60±1.23 eggs, mixed stages and adults of T. urticae, respectively. Whereas, the male predatory mite, A. finlandicus in its entire life period consumed 19.07±1.49, 14.60±1.06 and 9.00±1.19 eggs, mixed stages and adults of O. indicus, 16.03±1.14, 10.37±1.44 and 8.40±1.06 eggs, mixed stages and adults of P. latus and 42.03±3.99, 21.50±2.22 and 15.87±1.38 eggs, mixed stages and adults of T. urticae, respectively. While, the female consumed 23.70±1.79, 16.57±1.14 and 9.7±1.14 eggs, mixed stages and adults of O. indicus, 19.27±1.49, 11.83±1.28 and 10.47±1.32 eggs, mixed stages and adults of P. latus and 51.83±5.06, 26.63±1.85 and 18.63±1.35 eggs, mixed stages and adults of T. urticae, respectively. In case of the male A. longispinosus it consumed 32.24±2.09, 18.37±1.38 and 14.44±1.01 eggs, mixed stages and adults of O. indicus, 28.50±1.76, 22.37±1.43 and 18.47±1.61 eggs, mixed stages and adults of P. latus and 48.07±3.48, 23.43±1.34 and 16.03±1.09 eggs, mixed stages and adults of T. urticae, respectively in its entire life period. While, the female consumed 40.60±2.35, 23.87±1.47 and 19.07±1.06 eggs, mixed stages and adults of O. indicus, 37.40±1.46, 28.54±1.38 and 23.84±1.81 eggs, mixed stages and adults of P. latus and 56.27±3.37, 31.54±1.16 and 19.93±1.75 eggs, mixed stages and adults of T. urticae, respectively. The effects of toxicity of different acaro-insecticides under laboratory conditions, assessed by calculating per cent mortality of eggs, nymphs and adult stages of A. longispinosus, A. finlandicus and A. longispinosus resulting 12 h, 24 h, 36 h, 48 h, 60 h and 72 h after treatment. The effects were classified by IOBC classification indicated that propergite 0.067 per cent was slightly harmful (>30% mortality) to eggs of A. alstoniae, A. finlandicus and adults of A. finlandicus and A. longispinosus. Spiromesifen at concentrations 0.0129, 0.0229 and 0.0329 per cent were harmless (<30% mortality) to all stages of A. alstoniae, A. finlandicus and A. longispinosus. Wettable sulphur 0.04 per cent was classified as slightly harmful (>30% mortality) to eggs of A. alstoniae and adults of A. longispinosus. Wettable sulphur 0.05 per cent was slightly harmful (>30% mortality) to all stages of A. alstoniae, A. finlandicus and A. longispinosus. Wettable sulphur 0.06 per cent Abstract was slightly harmful (>30% mortality) to eggs, nymphs and adults of A. alstoniae, eggs and nymphs of A. finlandicus and A. longispinosus while moderately harmful (>79% mortality) to adults of A. finlandicus and A. longispinosus. Difenthiuron at 0.04, 0.05 and 0.06 and fenpyroximate at 0.04, 0.05 and 0.06 per cent concentrations were harmless (<30% mortality) to eggs, nymphs and adults of all of the phytoseiid mites. Ethion 0.06 per cent was moderately harmful (>79% mortality) to nymphs of A. finlandicus and A. longispinosus and adults of A. longispinosus. Acephate 0.10 per cent was moderately harmful (>79% mortality) to nymphs of A. finlandicus and adults of A. longispinosus. Fenazaquin all concentrations testes viz., 0.005, 0.010 and 0.015 per cent were harmless (<30% mortality) to all of three phytoseiid mites. The interaction of predatory mites viz., A. alstoniae, A. finlandicus and A. longispinosus with three species of phytophagous mites viz., O. indicus, P. latus and T. urticae was studied at different predator : prey ratios (1:10, 1:20, 1:30, 1:40 and 1:50) under polyhouse conditions during October 2014-15 and 2015-16 along with control (no predator). At 1:10 predator : prey ratio A. alstoniae caused maximum reduction of O. indicus, P. latus as well as T. urticae at 32 DAR (Days After Release). Reduction in population of the prey mites was decreased as ratio of predator : prey increased. A. alstoniae completely eliminated P. latus at 1:10 and 1:20 predator : prey ratio at 32 DAR while, at 1:10 ratio A. alstoniae brought population of T. urticae to zero at 28 DAR and at 1:20 ratio, it was brought to zero at 32 DAR. A. finlandicus at 1:10 predator : prey ratio reduced the population of O. indicus and P. latus to zero at 32 DAR. At 1:10 predator : prey ratio A. longispinosus caused complete reduction of P. latus at 28 DAR while at 1:20 predator : prey ratio it was brought to zero at 32 DAR. A. longispinosus brought population of T. urticae to zero at 1:10 and 1:20 predator : prey ratio at 28 DAR, while at 1:30 predator : prey ratio it was brought to zero at 32 DAR.
Educational Use Research
Education Level UG and PG
Learning Resource Type Thesis
Publisher Place Gujarat
Size (in Bytes) 21.51 MB
Page Count 343