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Author Adleman, L. ♦ Rivest, R. L. ♦ Shamir, A.
Source ACM Digital Library
Content type Text
Publisher Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
File Format PDF
Language English
Subject Keyword Privacy ♦ Public-key cryptosystems ♦ Authentication ♦ Electronic funds transfer ♦ Message-passing ♦ Electronic mail ♦ Cryptography ♦ Security ♦ Factorization ♦ Digital signatures ♦ Prime number
Abstract An encryption method is presented with the novel property that publicly revealing an encryption key does not thereby reveal the corresponding decryption key. This has two important consequences: (1) Couriers or other secure means are not needed to transmit keys, since a message can be enciphered using an encryption key publicly revealed by the intented recipient. Only he can decipher the message, since only he knows the corresponding decryption key. (2) A message can be “signed” using a privately held decryption key. Anyone can verify this signature using the corresponding publicly revealed encryption key. Signatures cannot be forged, and a signer cannot later deny the validity of his signature. This has obvious applications in “electronic mail” and “electronic funds transfer” systems. A message is encrypted by representing it as a number M, raising M to a publicly specified power e, and then taking the remainder when the result is divided by the publicly specified product, n, of two large secret primer numbers p and q. Decryption is similar; only a different, secret, power d is used, where e * d ≡ 1(mod (p - 1) * (q - 1)). The security of the system rests in part on the difficulty of factoring the published divisor, n.
Description Affiliation: MIT Lab. for Computer Science and Department of Mathematics, Cambridge, MA (Rivest, R. L.; Shamir, A.; Adleman, L.)
Age Range 18 to 22 years ♦ above 22 year
Educational Use Research
Education Level UG and PG
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 2005-08-01
Publisher Place New York
Journal Communications of the ACM (CACM)
Volume Number 21
Issue Number 2
Page Count 7
Starting Page 120
Ending Page 126


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Source: ACM Digital Library