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Author Venkataraman, Shivaram ♦ Franklin, Michael J. ♦ Bailis, Peter ♦ Hellerstein, Joseph M. ♦ Stoica, Ion
Source ACM Digital Library
Content type Text
Publisher Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
File Format PDF
Language English
Abstract Data replication results in a fundamental trade-off between operation latency and consistency. At the weak end of the spectrum of possible consistency models is eventual consistency, which provides no limit to the staleness of data returned. However, anecdotally, eventual consistency is often "good enough" for practitioners given its latency and availability benefits. In this work, we explain this phenomenon and demonstrate that, despite their weak guarantees, eventually consistent systems regularly return consistent data while providing lower latency than their strongly consistent counterparts. To quantify the behavior of eventually consistent stores, we introduce Probabilistically Bounded Staleness (PBS), a consistency model that provides expected bounds on data staleness with respect to both versions and wall clock time. We derive a closed-form solution for version-based staleness and model real-time staleness for a large class of quorum replicated, Dynamo-style stores. Using PBS, we measure the trade-off between latency and consistency for partial, non-overlapping quorum systems under Internet production workloads. We quantitatively demonstrate how and why eventually consistent systems frequently return consistent data within tens of milliseconds while offering large latency benefits.
Description Affiliation: University of California, Berkeley (Bailis, Peter; Venkataraman, Shivaram; Franklin, Michael J.; Hellerstein, Joseph M.; Stoica, Ion)
Age Range 18 to 22 years ♦ above 22 year
Educational Use Research
Education Level UG and PG
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 2005-08-01
Publisher Place New York
Journal Communications of the ACM (CACM)
Volume Number 57
Issue Number 8
Page Count 10
Starting Page 93
Ending Page 102


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Source: ACM Digital Library