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Author Anerousis, J. P. ♦ Whitman, S. K.
Source United States Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information
Content type Text
Language English
Subject Keyword NATURAL GAS ♦ HYDROGEN SULFIDES ♦ REMOVAL ♦ DESULFURIZATION ♦ HYDRATES ♦ IRON OXIDES ♦ IRON SULFIDES ♦ SULFIDATION ♦ SULFUR CONTENT ♦ CHALCOGENIDES ♦ CHEMICAL REACTIONS ♦ ENERGY SOURCES ♦ FLUIDS ♦ FOSSIL FUELS ♦ FUEL GAS ♦ FUELS ♦ GAS FUELS ♦ GASES ♦ HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS ♦ IRON COMPOUNDS ♦ OXIDES ♦ OXYGEN COMPOUNDS ♦ SULFIDES ♦ SULFUR COMPOUNDS ♦ TRANSITION ELEMENT COMPOUNDS 030300* -- Natural Gas-- Drilling, Production, & Processing
Abstract Engineering, research, and field data have been updated to present a detailed evaluation of gas sweetening via the iron sponge process. The iron sponge process is one of the oldest known methods for the removal of hydrogen sulfide and sulfur compounds from gas streams. The technique originated in Europe over 100 years ago and is still widely used today for gas sweetening. The process entails passing sour gas (i.e., a gas stream containing hydrogen sulfide and/or mercaptans) across a bed of hydrated iron oxide. The subsequent reaction with hydrogen sulfide produces iron sulfides and a small amount of byproduct water. The earliest operators actually employed a naturally occurring form of the hydrated iron oxide, referred to as bog iron or bog ore, but which is more correctly known as limonite (i.e., hydrous iron oxides that mineralogically are composed of various mixtures of goethite and/or legidocrocite).
Educational Use Research
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 1985-02-18
Publisher Department Physichem Tecnologies Inc., Austin, TX
Publisher Place United States
Journal Oil Gas J.
Volume Number 83
Issue Number 7
Organization Physichem Tecnologies Inc., Austin, TX


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