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Author John, Hay ♦ Scott, Velduizen ♦ John, Cairney ♦ Yw, Kwan Matthew ♦ Bray, Steven R. ♦ Faught, Brent E.
Source Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)
Content type Text
Publisher BioMed Central
File Format HTM / HTML
Date Created 2013-03-12
Copyright Year ©2012
Language English
Subject Domain (in LCC) RC620-627 ♦ RA1-1270
Subject Keyword Physical education ♦ Nutritional diseases ♦ Deficiency diseases ♦ Prospective cohort study ♦ Public aspects of medicine ♦ Internal medicine ♦ Medicine ♦ Athletic competence ♦ Specialties of internal medicine
Abstract Abstract Background The current study examined associations between gender, perceived athletic competence, and enjoyment of physical education (PE) class over time in a cohort of children enrolled in grade four (ages 9 or 10) at baseline (n = 2262). Methods We assessed each student 5 times over a period of 2 years. We used mixed effects modeling to examine change over time in enjoyment of PE. Results Enjoyment of PE declined among girls but remained constant among boys. Higher levels of perceived competence were associated with higher PE enjoyment. A 3-way interaction between gender, competence, and time revealed that PE enjoyment was lowest and declined most markedly among girls with low perceived athletic competence. Among boys with low competence, enjoyment remained at a consistently low level. Conclusions Our results indicate that lower perceived athletic competence is associated with low enjoyment of PE, and, among girls, with declining enjoyment. Findings suggest that interventions in a PE context that target perceived competence should be considered in future work.
ISSN 14795868
Age Range 18 to 22 years ♦ above 22 year
Educational Use Research
Education Level UG and PG ♦ Career/Technical Study
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 2012-03-01
e-ISSN 14795868
Journal International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
Volume Number 9
Issue Number 1
Starting Page 26


Source: Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)