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Author Yang, Wang ♦ Anne, Ellaway ♦ Ferguson, Neil S. ♦ Jonathan, Murray ♦ Lamb, Karen E. ♦ David, Ogilvie
Source Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)
Content type Text
Publisher BioMed Central
File Format HTM / HTML
Date Created 2013-03-12
Copyright Year ©2012
Language English
Subject Domain (in LCC) RC620-627 ♦ RA1-1270
Subject Keyword Intensity ♦ Nutritional diseases ♦ Deficiency diseases ♦ Public aspects of medicine ♦ Accessibility ♦ Deprivation ♦ Internal medicine ♦ Recreational physical activity ♦ Medicine ♦ Transport ♦ Specialties of internal medicine
Abstract Abstract Background People living in neighbourhoods of lower socioeconomic status have been shown to have higher rates of obesity and a lower likelihood of meeting physical activity recommendations than their more affluent counterparts. This study examines the sociospatial distribution of access to facilities for moderate or vigorous intensity physical activity in Scotland and whether such access differs by the mode of transport available and by Urban Rural Classification. Methods A database of all fixed physical activity facilities was obtained from the national agency for sport in Scotland. Facilities were categorised into light, moderate and vigorous intensity activity groupings before being mapped. Transport networks were created to assess the number of each type of facility accessible from the population weighted centroid of each small area in Scotland on foot, by bicycle, by car and by bus. Multilevel modelling was used to investigate the distribution of the number of accessible facilities by small area deprivation within urban, small town and rural areas separately, adjusting for population size and local authority. Results Prior to adjustment for Urban Rural Classification and local authority, the median number of accessible facilities for moderate or vigorous intensity activity increased with increasing deprivation from the most affluent or second most affluent quintile to the most deprived for all modes of transport. However, after adjustment, the modelling results suggest that those in more affluent areas have significantly higher access to moderate and vigorous intensity facilities by car than those living in more deprived areas. Conclusions The sociospatial distributions of access to facilities for both moderate intensity and vigorous intensity physical activity were similar. However, the results suggest that those living in the most affluent neighbourhoods have poorer access to facilities of either type that can be reached on foot, by bicycle or by bus than those living in less affluent areas. This poorer access from the most affluent areas appears to be reversed for those with access to a car.
ISSN 14795868
Age Range 18 to 22 years ♦ above 22 year
Educational Use Research
Education Level UG and PG ♦ Career/Technical Study
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 2012-07-01
e-ISSN 14795868
Journal International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
Volume Number 9
Issue Number 1
Starting Page 55


Source: Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)