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Subject Keyword GEOTHERMAL ENERGY ♦ HOT-DRY-ROCK SYSTEMS ♦ ENERGY SOURCE DEVELOPMENT ♦ FEASIBILITY STUDIES ♦ NEW MEXICO ♦ EFFICIENCY ♦ FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE ♦ GEOTHERMAL FIELDS ♦ GEOTHERMAL WELLS ♦ INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION ♦ LASL ♦ MOUNTAINS ♦ RESEARCH PROGRAMS ♦ WELL RECOVERY EQUIPMENT ♦ COOPERATION ♦ ENERGY SYSTEMS ♦ EQUIPMENT ♦ FEDERAL REGION VI ♦ FIELD PRODUCTION EQUIPMENT ♦ FINANCIAL INCENTIVES ♦ FINANCING ♦ GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS ♦ NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS ♦ NORTH AMERICA ♦ US AEC ♦ US DOE ♦ US ERDA ♦ US ORGANIZATIONS ♦ USA ♦ WELLS 150900* -- Geothermal Engineering
Abstract This article describes how geothermal experts at the Los Alamos National Laboratory have created the world's deepest, hottest, hot dry rock geothermal reservoir two miles deep on the flanks of a dormant volcano. The reservoir, in the Jemez Mountains near Los Alamos, lies 10,000 to 12,000 feet below the surface in hot granitic rock. Los Alamos pioneered the concept of extracting energy from hot dry rock in 1970, and its US DOE-funded program is now also supported in part by Japan and West Germany. The reservoir was created in a wellbore reaching a measured depth of 15,289 feet. Although basic drilling and fracturing techniques used to develop the reservoir are common to commercial oil and gas exploration, inclined drilling and fracturing at depth in such hard, hot rock demanded that the Laboratory's researchers, in collaboration with industry and geothermal consultants, design and fabricate much of the equipment and instrumentation needed to bring in the reservoir.
Educational Use Research
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 1984-07-01
Publisher Place United States
Journal Geotherm. Energy Mag.
Volume Number 12
Issue Number 7


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