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Author Harrison, David C. ♦ Seah, Winston K G ♦ Rayudu, Ramesh
Source ACM Digital Library
Content type Text
Publisher Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
File Format PDF
Copyright Year ©2016
Language English
Subject Domain (in DDC) Computer science, information & general works ♦ Data processing & computer science
Subject Keyword Wireless sensor networks ♦ Duty cycling ♦ Energy harvesting ♦ Rare events
Abstract Rarely occurring events present unique challenges to energy constrained systems designed for long term sensing of their occurrence or effect. Unlike periodic sampling or query based sensing systems, longevity cannot be achieved simply by adjusting the sensing nodes’ duty cycle until an equitable balance between data density and network lifetime is established. The low probability of occurrence and random nature of rare events makes it difficult to guarantee duty cycled battery powered sensing nodes will be energised when events occur. Equally, it is usually considered impractical to leave the sensing nodes energised at all times if the network is to have an acceptably long operational life. In the past decade and a half, wireless sensor network research has addressed this aspect of rare event sensing by investigating techniques including synchronised duty cycling of redundant nodes, passive sensing, duplicate message suppression, and energy efficient network protocols. Researchers have also demonstrated the efficacy of harvesting energy from the environment to extend operational life. Here we survey existing rare event detection and propagation techniques, and suggest areas suitable for continued research.
ISSN 03600300
Age Range 18 to 22 years ♦ above 22 year
Educational Use Research
Education Level UG and PG
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 2016-03-01
Publisher Place New York
e-ISSN 15577341
Journal ACM Computing Surveys (CSUR)
Volume Number 48
Issue Number 4
Page Count 22
Starting Page 1
Ending Page 22


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Source: ACM Digital Library