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Author Weiss, J. D. ♦ Lopez, S. S. ♦ Howard, A. J.
Source United States Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information
Content type Text
Language English
Subject Keyword INSTRUMENTATION, INCLUDING NUCLEAR AND PARTICLE DETECTORS ♦ STRAIN GAGES ♦ GALLIUM ARSENIDES ♦ FIBER OPTICS ♦ OPTICAL PROPERTIES ♦ TRANSMISSION ♦ ABSORPTIVITY ♦ VISIBLE RADIATION ♦ COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION ♦ FINITE ELEMENT METHOD
Abstract We have investigated the use of gallium arsenide (GaAs) as an optical strain gauge, presuming the shift in its absorption edge with uniaxial stress as the principle of operation. In our experiments, optical fibers guided light of the GaAs samples from a laser diode source and from the samples to an optical detector, as might be the case in a practical application of such a device. Compressive and tensile strains were developed in the samples by flexing a cantilevered beam to which they were bonded. An important understanding of this strain distribution was obtained with the help of a finite-element calculation. The effects of sample width and the input optical energy distribution on the strain-induced change in optical transmission were measured. In the case of the distribution with the shortest median wavelength, over 80{percent} change in transmission was observed for a compressive strain of only 0.05{percent}. In addition, we calculated the strain sensitivity of this device, assuming only a rigid, strain-induced shift in its absorption edge. A comparison between experiment and calculation suggests that strain also caused the band edge of these samples to steepen in compression and broaden in tension. Another calculation suggests that this phenomenon is not intrinsic to the material. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}
ISSN 00346748
Educational Use Research
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 1996-04-01
Publisher Department Sandia National Laboratory
Publisher Place United States
Journal Review of Scientific Instruments
Volume Number 67
Issue Number 4
Organization Sandia National Laboratory


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