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Author Meyrier, A. ♦ Simon, P. ♦ Perret, G. ♦ Condamin-Meyrier, M. C.
Source British Medical Journal (The BMJ)
Content type Text
Publisher British Medical Journal Publishing Group
File Format HTM / HTML
Language English
Abstract Nephrotic syndrome in minimal change lipoid nephrosis and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis may be due to alteration of glomerular anionic sites by a lymphokine. Six adults with nephrotic syndrome who were resistant to treatment with corticosteroids and immunosuppressants were treated with cyclosporin A. In three patients with minimal change lipoid nephrosis who had been nephrotic for 3.5 to 23 years proteinuria resolved within 12 to 42 days. Subsequently, these patients became dependent on cyclosporin A. In three patients with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis who had been nephrotic for four to six years mean (SD) 24 hour urinary protein decreased from 14.7 (8.4) g to 3.6 (0.6) g within 20 to 25 days, serum albumin concentration rose, and oedema subsided. One patient died of myocardial infarction when still in partial remission after 11 weeks' treatment. Two patients remained proteinuric despite continuing treatment with cyclosporin A, but control of sodium balance was easy and serum albumin concentrations remained higher than without cyclosporin A. In all patients renal function improved during treatment. These preliminary results show that cyclosporin A may be effective in the treatment of patients with nephrotic syndrome that resists every other form of treatment and especially in the treatment of those with minimal change lipoid nephrosis. The results are in keeping with a T lymphocyte mediated mechanism of minimal change lipoid nephrosis and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, but they also suggest that minimal change lipoid nephrosis and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis are separate entities.
Description Citation Reference: British Medical Journal (Clinical Research Ed.)
ISSN 02670623
Age Range 18 to 22 years ♦ above 22 year
Educational Use Research
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 1986-03-22
e-ISSN 14685833
Journal British Medical Journal (The BMJ)
Volume Number 292
Issue Number 6523
Page Count 4
Starting Page 789
Ending Page 792


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Source: British Medical Journal (The BMJ)