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Author Yip, S. ♦ Coroller, T. ♦ Rios Velazquez, E. ♦ Parmar, C. ♦ Mak, R. ♦ Aerts, H. ♦ Kim, J.
Source United States Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information
Content type Text
Language English
Subject Keyword APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES ♦ RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY ♦ BIOLOGICAL MARKERS ♦ BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY ♦ CAT SCANNING ♦ FLUORINE 18 ♦ FLUORINE COMPOUNDS ♦ FORECASTING ♦ LUNGS ♦ MUTANTS ♦ NEOPLASMS ♦ POSITRON COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY ♦ SOMATIC MUTATIONS ♦ TESTING
Abstract Purpose: Although PET-based radiomic features have been proposed to quantify tumor heterogeneity and shown promise in outcome prediction, little is known about their relationship with tumor genetics. This study assessed the association of [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET-based radiomic features with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) mutations. Methods: 348 NSCLC patients underwent FDG-PET/CT scans before treatment and were tested for genetic mutations. 13% (44/348) and 28% (96/348) patients were found to harbor EGFR (EGFR+) and KRAS (KRAS+) mutations, respectively. We evaluated nineteen PET-based radiomic features quantifying phenotypic traits, and compared them with conventional PET features (metabolic tumor volume (MTV) and maximum-SUV). The association between the feature values and mutation status was evaluated using the Wilcoxcon-rank-sum-test. The ability of each measure to predict mutations was assessed by the area under the receiver operating curve (AUC). Noether’s test was used to determine if the AUCs were significantly from random (AUC=0.50). All p-values were corrected for multiple testing by controlling the false discovery rate (FDR{sub Wilcoxon} and FDR{sub Noether}) of 10%. Results: Eight radiomic features, MTV, and maximum-SUV, were significantly associated with the EGFR mutation (FDR{sub Wilcoxon}=0.01–0.10). However, KRAS+ demonstrated no significantly distinctive imaging features compared to KRAS− (FDR{sub Wilcoxon}≥0.92). EGFR+ and EGFR− were significantly discriminated by conventional PET features (AUC=0.61, FDR{sub Noether}=0.04 for MTV and AUC=0.64, FDR{sub Noether}=0.01 for maximum-SUV). Eight radiomic features were significantly predictive for EGFR+ compared to EGFR− (AUC=0.59–0.67, FDR{sub Noether}=0.0032–0.09). Normalized-inverse-difference-moment outperformed all features in predicting EGFR mutation (AUC=0.67, FDR{sub Noether}=0.0032). Moreover, only the radiomic feature normalized-inverse-difference-moment could significantly predict KRAS+ from EGFR+ (AUC=0.65, FDR{sub Noether}=0.05). All measures failed to predict KRAS+ from KRAS− (AUC=0.50–0.54, FDR{sub Noether}≥0.92). Conclusion: PET imaging features were strongly associated with EGFR mutations in NSCLC. Radiomic features have great potential in predicting EGFR mutations. Our study may help develop a non-invasive imaging biomarker for EGFR mutation. R.M. has consulting interests with Amgen.
ISSN 00942405
Educational Use Research
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 2016-06-15
Publisher Place United States
Journal Medical Physics
Volume Number 43
Issue Number 6


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